Financial Data
Updated 15 Oct 2019


7 Deadly sins of business meetings

Skype meetings used to be a weekly ritual for a health-care IT company with offices across various states.


Lisa Girard, Entrepreneur, 25 September 2012  Share  0 comments  Print


All the answers to your unique business lifestage questions

However, the company co-founder and CEO felt weekly meetings influenced productivity and weren’t really needed.

The meeting schedule changed to once a month, using Google Hangouts so that 10 people can share the screen in a less formal setting. That made everyone happier—and more productive.

This company is not alone when it comes to dysfunctional meetings. For many businesses, routine meetings can lack focus and a clear agenda and end up wasting time and boring people.

“The last thing a meeting organiser wants is their attendees to be sitting in a conference room or on the phone wondering what the meeting is for, why they were asked to join, or what the output will be,” says Kathryn Hammond, owner of BlueSpire Strategic Marketing, a marketing company.

“If a meeting doesn’t have a defined agenda and concrete next steps, I can almost guarantee you will see people playing with their phones or hear people typing in the background.”

What to watch for in meetings

1. Meetings that become useless rituals. Companies frequently meet simply because it’s time for their weekly, monthly or annual sales meeting.

“Meetings that are ritualistic instead of necessary are often boring, and attendees eventually flip an ‘off switch’ in their brains,” says Joe Calloway, business strategy consultant and author of Becoming A Category of One (John Wiley, 2003).

Tip: First, re-examine your routine. “Do not have a meeting unless you can very specifically define why it’s necessary and how it will advance the strategy of the organisation,” he says. Also, create a specific agenda and send it out early enough for people to prepare.

2. Meetings that are a one-way conversation. People often tune out monotone lecturers and mind-numbing PowerPoint presentations. “A one-way speech is generally one of the least effective ways of teaching, informing or motivating people to action,” Calloway says.

Tip: Encourage your team to speak up, exchange ideas and comment on what they’ve heard. If you show PowerPoint slides, make them visually interesting and keep words and numbers to a minimum.

3. Meetings with lax leadership. In today’s “virtual” conference rooms, time is often wasted waiting for people to join the call and then getting stragglers up to speed on what they missed.

“This punishes the people who joined the meeting on time with the likelihood you’ll run over, leaving employees stressed out playing catch-up on the rest of their day,” says Gary Bradt, business strategy expert and author of The Ring in the Rubble (McGraw Hill, 2007).

Tip: Choose a leader who is organised and forceful, leaving latecomers to catch up on their own. “Use tact, of course – you don’t have to be Attila the Hun – but if you’re too nice, it allows too much nonsense to go on,” Bradt says.

4. Meetings that harp on setbacks instead of strategies. One of Bradt’s clients spent 95% of each meeting having plant managers explain why their numbers weren’t up to par and only 5% planning future strategies. Not surprisingly, Brandt says, everyone came out of the meeting with a long face.

Tip: Use the past as a platform for understanding and planning future actions, not “a battering ram to beat people up,” Bradt says. The collective brainpower in the room should be used to avoid mistakes going forward.

5. Meetings that disrupt the most productive hours. Many companies hold meetings in the morning, interrupting employees’ most productive hours, says Jackie Freiberg, co-author of Nanovation: How a Little Car Can Teach the World to Think Big and Act Bold (Thomas Nelson, 2011).

Tip: Schedule meetings in the afternoon, when escaping the cubicle can be a welcome relief.

6. Meetings that are held in a bland environment. At the vast majority of meetings, employees gather around a conference table and keep their gaze focused on the leader at the head of the table. Freiberg believes this format does little to stimulate discussion and creative ideas.

Tip: Take your employees on a “walking” meeting in the park or just around the building and parking lot.

“When you’re not eye to eye, you have the guts to say certain things,” Freiberg says. “And when walking, you look at the world differently, which stimulates fresh ideas.”

7. Meetings that are too formal and rigid. Few meeting leaders have a sense of humour. The result is a room full of bored, restless employees, says Eric Chester, author of Reviving Work Ethic (Greenleaf Books, 2012).

Tip: Break up the meeting with music, a video, jokes or an engaging story, Chester says. “In the age of YouTube and iTunes, there’s simply no reason to not inject a bit of levity in a meeting to gain attention, disarm negativity and generate enthusiasm.”

Entrepreneur Mag Logo

Copyright is owned by Entrepreneur Media SA and/or Entrepreneur Media Inc.
All rights reserved. Click here to read our editorial disclaimer.

Rate It12345rating

About the author


Lisa Girard, Entrepreneur


Introducing the cash solutions for a growing business

Are your cash solutions supporting your growing business? Leigh Livanos, Head of Payments, Collections & Cash for Business & Commercial Banking explains how your cash solutions needs will evolve as your business expands.

Login to comment