Financial Data
Updated 29 Feb 2020


Run things like a boss: Tactics for better management of your company

Approximately half of all employees end up quitting their job because of a bad manager. Are you managing your team like a true (inspirational) leader? 


Pritesh Ruthun, 09 September 2017  Share  0 comments  Print


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A survey by Gallup found that nearly half of the world’s employees would rather quit their job than stay and work with their manager. Why? Gallup’s survey found that employees feel as though they are not given enough guidance for a holistic understanding of what’s expected of them at work.

“Only 12% of employees strongly agreed that their manager helps set work priorities, and that 12% tends to be much happier at work than those who scored their bosses’ goal-setting at the bottom end of the scale,” says Fortune correspondent, Benjamin Snyder.

Related: 5 Factors that make a great boss


TAKE NOTE

“Too many companies bet on having a cut-throat, high-pressure, take-no-prisoners culture to drive their financial success,” say Harvard Business Review’s (HBR) Emma Seppala and Kim Cameron. “Although there’s an assumption that stress and pressure push employees to perform more, better, and faster, what these businesses fail to recognise is the hidden costs incurred.”


Why you need to be a better manager

Managers who are motivated (and can motivate their team in the same way) are genuine assets that are hard to come by these days. Motivational interaction increases productivity and employee satisfaction. Managers must be leaders who can spot employees' strengths and encourage them to develop their skill sets.

“The best managers have a keen eye for areas that could be improved and know how to approach these issues diplomatically, so workers feel encouraged to make productive changes, rather than discouraged by their shortcomings,” HBR’s correspondents say.

Management benefits you’ll unlock by through motivating every day:

  • You’ll empower employees to take ownership of projects, rather than wait for step-by-step instruction.
  • You’ll create an energetic and highly-motivated workplace that not only retains talent, but also attracts new talent.
  • You’ll be showing genuine appreciation for your employees’ accomplishments.
  • You’ll be supporting co-workers who are under stress.

Billionaire advice on being a better manager

Cash-money-billionaires, Mark Cuban and Warren Buffet believe in ‘dreaming bigger’ and ‘surrounding yourself with good people’.

Mark Cuban on management

Outspoken entrepreneur, Mark Cuban offered important advice to his fellow Shark Tankinvestor, Robert Herjavec. “Always aim higher and reach for bigger goals in life,” Cuban said. It's advice that apparently meant a lot to Herjavec, according to CNBC.com.

Related: You’re the boss, so be the boss

"He [Cuban] looks and me says: 'You know? You're a good guy. And so, I'm going to give you a piece of advice. You have to dream bigger,'" Herjavec says. "You're always trying to protect your downside, think about the upside." Cuban believes that this sort of sanguinity, as a manager, can help you and your team achieve any task you set out to accomplish.

Warren Buffet on management

“You have to surround yourself with good people,” says Warren Buffett. The second-richest person in the world shares advice that could easily translate to managers: “Be with people who share your values and push you to achieve.” He says managers must associate with people who are the kind of person they'd like to be. 


KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • A survey by Gallup found that nearly half of the world’s employees rather quit their job than stay and work with their manager.
  • Managers who are motivated (and can motivate their team in the same way) are genuine assets that are hard to come by these days.
  • The best managers have a keen eye for areas that could be improved and know how to approach these issues diplomatically.
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Pritesh Ruthun


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