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Updated 16 Aug 2017


Ensure a smooth exit process for your fleet drivers with these tips

To avoid friction when dismissing a driver, ensure that you implement these techniques to create a streamlined dismissal procedure. 


Nicole Crampton, 09 August 2017  Share  0 comments  Print


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You will lose drivers, it’s inevitable. What you don’t want to lose are vehicles along with those drivers. Although Erik Rasmussen, director of strategic operations for PARS Incorporated, says that this type of situation is rare (since companies are usually anxious to get their vehicles back from exiting employees), an ex-employee can take off with your vehicles, and it’s better to be prepared than risk losing a vehicle to a disgruntled ex-worker.

Related: Are your drivers leaving in droves? Address and prevent this today


KEY LEARNING

“This type of situation is rare since companies are usually anxious to get their vehicles back from exiting employees,” says Erik Rasmussen, director of strategic operations for PARS Inc., a fleet driveway company. But it still happens and you need to be prepared for it. 


Here are two preventative measures you can try to ensure you don’t find yourself arguing with an ex-employee about when they will return your fleet vehicle:

1. Have a vehicle return strategy in place 

If an employee can’t drop-off the fleet vehicle, your business needs to have a process in place for collection. By having the ex-driver call human resources or the company’s fleet support number, you can organise to collect the vehicle.

“With either option, the fleet department or fleet management company, will be concerned about the safe and speedy recovery of the vehicle asset and will often be able to work with the transporter to expedite the pickup of the fleet vehicle,” says Rasmussen.

Another option is to have a dedicated drop-off location that both your business and your ex-driver have agreed to. Rasmussen says that former employees can work out deals with human resources to leave a vehicle at an agreed-upon location. “Maybe they have negotiated with human resources that they’re going to leave the vehicle at a hotel or with the hotel manager. Those situations are a little rarer.”

For example, Rasmussen notes an instance where a company vehicle was abandoned in an airport parking lot. In another case, he witnessed an ex-employee leaving a fleet vehicle with a former co-worker or manager. 

Related: Time to upgrade your telematics and remote temperature monitoring systems

2. Incorporate active reporting 

Active reporting is a process where your business streamlines the process of exiting employees returning vehicles. This helps you keep track of exactly where the vehicle is at all times and how far your employee is with their final project.

“Again, communication is key, setting the expectations upfront and then proactively communicating to that separating employee. And as part of that communication, also providing them with the right contact information if they have questions,” says Rasmussen.

If you have a clear strategy in place to deal with possible eventualities of non-returned vehicles, these tips can help you. But always remember to keep your exiting driver in the loop so they know what is expected of them once they leave.  


TRY THIS

  • If a separating employee can’t drop-off the fleet vehicle your business needs to have a process in place for collection.
  • Another option is to have a dedicated drop-off location that both your business and your ex-driver have agreed to.
  • Active reporting helps you keep track of exactly where the vehicle is at all times.
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About the author


Nicole Crampton


Introducing the owner-driver responsibilities & risks

Bryan Verpoort, Head of Corporate & Business Insurance at Standard Bank advises smaller businesses on the risks and considerations when contracting to transport goods for a large company.

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