Financial Data
Updated 20 Oct 2020


Allan Knott-Craig answers your questions on finding a funder to managing your staff

What you really need to know to land an investor. 


Allan Knott-Craig, Entrepreneur, 01 May 2018  Share  0 comments  Print


All the answers to your unique business lifestage questions

Focus on one customer at a time. Make that customer happy. Move to next customer. Aim for ‘1 000 true fans’, then keep them happy.

The rest will come.

1. How do I find an investor?

You have 4 options:

1. Angels

Applicable if you only have an idea, and you need cash to make your idea a reality. Usually between R500 000 and R1 million. You need to milk your network: Parents, friends of parents, colleagues, parents’ friends, friends. If you have no network, you need to build a network or use your savings. There is no math to these investments. You get money because they believe in you, not because they seriously expect a return.

Related: The cheat sheet to winning over investors

2. Early-stage VC

Applicable if you already have a working product with traction, ie: users and/growth, and you need cash to build out. Usually between R1 million and R2,5 million. There are a number of early-stage VC’s in South Africa, just ask around. Ideally you want an introduction from a trusted party. Failing that, just email them directly. Give a simple pitch. They’re looking for 15X return on investment.

3. Late-stage VC

Applicable if you have a critical mass of users and meaningful revenue, ie: R10 million a year, and you need cash to grow. The late-stage VC’s are the likes of 4Di, hard to get access without an introduction from a trusted third party, usually one of your existing investors. They are looking for a 5X return on investment.

4. Private equity

Applicable if you have a cash-generative business that requires capital to either exit a shareholder, or to grow profits exponentially. Looking for 25% IRR.

There are also state-sponsored sources of capital for entrepreneurs from previously disadvantaged backgrounds, for example the Technology Innovation Agency. This is ‘soft’ money, requiring no equity or personal surety. If you can get it, take it.

Investors are looking for return on capital. If I invest R100 in an early stage company, I want to get R1 500 (15x) back within a reasonable period of time, ie. no longer than five years.

The key metric is Total Addressable Market (TAM). The size of the market you’re targeting determines the potential size of your business.

Assume you target a market with a TAM of R100 million (profit), and you assume you can get 10% of that market by 2020. That means your business will have R10 million of profits in 2020.

A private company is valued at a maximum of 7x profit, so your company will be worth R70 million in 2020. If you ask me to invest R1 million today, I need 21% of your company in order to realise a 15x return (R15 million) by 2020.

Start with TAM, work from there. Remember, every assumption you make will be questioned. Minimise your assumptions. Maximise the evidence for your assumptions.

Related: See your start-up through investor eyes

2. If you are a start-up, what’s the most important thing you can do to grow?

Focus on one customer at a time. Make that customer happy. Move to next customer. Aim for ‘1 000 true fans’, then keep them happy.

The rest will come.

For consumer products, always make it easy for your customers to share. Friction-free sharing is the easiest marketing tool you can have.

Feature-creep is a big risk and can be a big distraction. You need one single value proposition that is enough to get customers. Having fifteen cool features will never compensate for the lack of one killer use case.

3. Our staff is growing, more than 20 now. Any tips on management? 

Having four or five staff is not hard. You don’t need to be a good manager or leader. You can muddle along. It’s when your team starts growing past the twenty number that management becomes a skill rather than a word.

There are hundreds are articles written on the art of management, but Jack Welch (former GE CEO) broke it down to this:

  • People want to know who they report to.
  • People want to know how they’re being measured.
  • People what want to know how they’re doing.
  • That’s it.
  • One boss. Clear KPIs. Regular feedback sessions.

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